TwitterFacebookLinkedInYouTube

Sofia Dmitrieva

Sofia Dmitrieva

Sofia Dmitrieva is a journalist with Russian News Time, a mentee at SBS and has an NITV mentorship. She harnesses her role in journalism to showcase each and every person she interviews, giving them a voice and opportunity to share their own stories.

This is her story.


 

I have always actively participated within my community, starting from when I was a kid.

Back then I would perform, dance and sing at various concerts and festivals, many of which were charity related (for instance a WW2 concert, where the funds all went towards veterans). I understood the importance of doing what I was doing and carried it through with me till now. Instead of simply performing, I now assist in organising various events, as well as cover them through news reporting at Russian News Time. By doing so, we shine a light on various communities and individuals, giving them a voice and an opportunity to be seen. People who we interview are from different backgrounds, nationalities and countries, and it is important to showcase each and every person.

There is always something challenging in every type of work out there, but personally for me sometimes translating can be a bit difficult. As with the type of content we film, we often have to translate footage, from Russian to English and vice versa. When doing so, it is important to stay true to the original context and not alter the original meaning. That's why we always take extra precaution when doing so, ensuring each story is represented by us in that same way.

Personally my biggest success has been covering different stories of different people from our multicultural community. Last year winning the Young Journalist of the Year award at the Premier’s Multicultural Communications Awards was definitely a highlight! Apart from that I am currently a Media Mentee at SBS and have an NITV Media Mentorship, working on building up my skills and on a community project. I got the chance to go back to Russia and study journalism at Moscow State University, which helped me in broadening my horizons.

Born here in Sydney, originally my parents moved here from Russia. My family consists of five people, my parents, sister and little brother. My parents essentially are the ones who made it possible for me to speak fluently, write and read in Russian, hence having a connection with my family heritage.

I'm glad to be able to call myself Australian, but also Russian too.

We try to go back to visit our relatives in Russia every so often, in order to not lose our ties with our ancestors and the bond we have to that country.

Australia is all about Multiculturalism. It is about knowing people from all around the globe and sharing values, knowledge and culture with each other in various ways. My friends, colleagues and university classmates all have different backgrounds and it is amazing that we can all come together as one.